What's your capacity?

What’s your capacity?

In this video, I take a look at a concept I came across in Daniel Priestley's book Oversubscribed: How to Get People Lining Up to Do Business with You.

In the book, Daniel talks about the concept from a business point of view, how many clients can you actually serve?

How many hours can you actually work in a day?

What I like about the concept is that you can apply this concept to the larger things in your life.

How much capacity do you have in your life for doing the things you love to do?

We understand that we have limited time in our life but very few of us get real about actually how much time we have and how we want to spend it.

When you apply this concept to your life you realise that your actual capacity is limited and you have to use the tools of acceptance and commitment coaching to accept that you can't have it all at the same time.

I know that my capacity is limited by my ability to work for no more than four to six hours a day.

After this I know I have to stop because I start to feel burnout and disconnected.

I know that I need to take regular rest times and even take time off during the week.

I know how long it really takes me to do things, like exercising an hour a day isn’t just about the exercise.

It is also about getting ready and travelling to the gym.

I need to account for an hour and a half to exercise for 40 minutes.

I also have to understand my capacity to manage my relationships and those closest to me.

I know that I am at my best when I am well rested, have had a productive day, have exercised and spent time on my own.

These are all aspects of me understanding myself and my emotional and physical capacity.

When you understand your actual capacity, you can build a life that stops you becoming overwhelmed and have time to fill your life with the things you love to do.

You can have it all, but not all at the same time.

Understanding your capacity in your life and being ok with it is one of the first steps in building a life you love for yourself.

When you first start to work this way, build in your rest time into your schedule, understand what you need to do to operate at your best it can produce anxiety.

We are socially conditioned to believe that we must be moving and doing all of the time.

But you have to build in rest time in your schedule to manage all areas of your life if you truly want balance.

When you first try this and decide to stop and rest with intention it can fill uncomfortable.

The fear and anxiety arise from your belief that you would get it all done, that you won’t achieve your goals.

But take an honest look at your life and what you want your life to be about and build in your capacity to achieve that life right from the start.

You can’t wish a more balanced, happier life into existence you have to create it for yourself.

That sometimes means you have to feel uncomfortable even when that means you are doing nothing but resting.

Understanding your capacity is about getting in touch with reality as it is and not how you wish it was.